Craigslist: Craigslist is definitely the scrappiest of the major online resale options. The advantage of Craigslist is its enticing profit potential, thanks to the total lack of listing and selling fees for most items. The disadvantages are many, but include potential safety risks and higher chances of nonpayment. If you do choose Craigslist, keep your wits about you and use the buddy system.
Best article I’ve read in a long time. I’m be traveling to Kiev on Monday so I’ll miss your webinar – but I’m sharing this with lots of folks who should listen in. Your point on technology is SO important. We learned way more than I ever thought we would on front-end, back-end and everything in between. There are so many people out there willing to build you a website – it’s important to know what you’re getting and what you own and that it’s original work. It’s amazing how many people don’t know how important these issues are. Thanks Jon for the inspiration this morning.
These three points may seem like common sense, but the truth is that the people who run these scams are very good at what they do. They’ve been able to deceive many intelligent people because they present their “opportunities” so well that almost anyone will believe them. When you’re looking for a new job or extra income, it’s easy to get lulled in to a comfort zone where they can take advantage of you. Keep your guard up – always.
While most of these companies advertise that you can earn upwards of $18 or so an hour, the reality is that you're not going to make that much once you figure in your gas expenses and wear and tear on your car. Also, work may not always come in consistently. I would recommend doing more than one of these if you really want to make it worth your while.
I also recommend FlexJobs for finding more home data entry jobs. With that site, you can regularly search legitimate work at home jobs for data entry and other industries. Every job lead is guaranteed scam-free, and it's the only membership-based jobs site I currently use and trust. Their listings are updated 5-6 times per week, and they are plentiful. You can currently get 30% off a subscription using promo code AFFILPROMO.
Remember that whether you're offering a service or selling a product, you'll need to market yourself to customers, complete the job, and then wait to get paid (30 to 90 days is standard in most industries). At the same time, you'll have start-up costs: office supplies and furniture, computer equipment, child care, and so on (see "Home-Office Essentials" for a list of what you'll need). Therefore, it is prudent to clean up your personal balance sheet and optimize your credit rating. Pay off any high-interest credit cards; this will give you a fresh start and more clout with potential lenders. The bad news is that no matter how fiscally attractive you look, it can be tough to get a loan from your local bank; start-up capital is notoriously difficult to come by. You might, however, try a Small Business Administration lender with access to microloan funds or one of several microloan funds designed for women, such as Count-Me-In.

"I get out of my home to work, and go to a Starbucks, Dunkin' Donuts, or other WiFi enabled establishment with actual tables, chairs, and people. It helps simulate the work environment for me -- white noise, chatter, that kind of thing -- that usually helps me work better than utter silence. It also removes the distractions I typically have at home like the urge to finally actually clean my room, do laundry, or watch TV.

Stan, you’ll want to set up an eBay store if you plan on making eBay a business. If you want to sell a few items here or there, it may not be worth it. It’s fairly easy to set up. You’ll be prompted to select monthly payments or yearly payments (to save money) as well, so bear that in mind. I would suggest monthly payments when just starting out as it’s a contract, meaning you must pay a large penalty if closing early.


“I think it depends almost entirely on the individual,” says Jenny Foss, a recruiter, career coach and founder of the career blog JobJenny.com. “As someone who made the transition--first to working part-time in an office and part-time at home, and then to being at home full time, and now, back to a split schedule--I understand first-hand that working from home is much different than an office environment. Those who are going adjust well to it, and be happy with working from home, will be those who are self-disciplined with their time, don't rely on face-to-face banter with co-workers throughout the day, and those who are independent when it comes to administrative issues that will invariably crop up throughout any given week.”
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