If you have skills that are in demand, you can always pick up odd jobs around your neighborhood, networking in the real world to find real-world jobs. But don't stop there! There are now so many ways to use the Internet to find small jobs. Short task sites offer diverse ways to find skilled and unskilled jobs both online and in the real world--shopping and performing price checks, cleaning, repairs, writing, editing, translation, transcription, data entry, website usability testing, social media tasks, surveys, and online research. 
Mentorship. With sites like Etsy, it simply doesn’t make sense to reinvent the wheel when opening a shop. Instead, look to others who have been down the path and have learned the hard way what to do – and what not to do. Blogs like Handmadeology and EverythingEtsy.com offer hints and guidance for artists just looking to get started in this profitable home-based business.

Although the demand is expected to decrease over the next decade, the opportunities are still there for travel agents who can harness the Internet to earn clients and help them plan their adventures. According to the BLS, job prospects may be best for travel agents who offer expertise in certain regions of the world, have experience planning tours or adventures, or who focus on group travel.
As is often the case with historical stigmas, that’s a huge bag of wrong. Stanford University economics professor Nicholas Bloom spearheaded a 2013 study of the Chinese travel website Ctrip, which offered its call-center staff the opportunity to work from home for nine months. Of the volunteers, half were able to telecommute, while the other half served as a control group back in the office. Ctrip, he says, was hoping to save money on China’s exorbitantly priced, worse-than-San-Francisco office space and trying to determine if those savings would outweigh any potential drops in productivity suffered by employees who were no longer in the office environment. “It was the classic growing-business problem,” Bloom says.
Want to do more than type words but instead create? Consider a career in writing. There are so many ways to be a writer (think blogging,  fiction writing, and children’s books), and most of them can be done from home either as a telecommuter and a freelancer. The great thing about writing is you can start small with very little experience. You won't make a lot at first but as you build your portfolio you can expand into more lucrative types of writing.

4.  Be flexible, boundaries may need to change. Working parents may need to shift their boundaries (move a working dinner to a working lunch, put in time after addressing her family or child care needs), but they have a high capacity and efficiency to get the job done.  Support these shifts knowing that you are exhibiting trust and support for this highly valuable work sector.


An entry-level salary often doesn’t go very far these days. According to a study by the Heldrich Center, the median starting salary for those who graduated from four-year degree programs in 2009 and 2010 was $27,000, down from $30,000 for those who graduated in 2006 to 2008, before the recession. (Try living on $27,000 a year — before taxes — in a city like New York, Washington or Chicago.)
Work keeps invading life. “It’s a lot easier to be distracted when you’re surrounded by the comforts of your own home,” says Ian Aronovich, mentioned above. “And unless you live alone, you’ll have family or housemates disturbing you when you’re working. When I was first starting up GovernmentAuctions.org with my business partner, my kitchen was my office. It was a nightmare when customers called for assistance and I had to take the calls during random hours of the day and night.”

”"G.I. Jobs is much more than just “Jobs”. It is an amazing One-Stop Shop for anyone transitioning from military service. I used it as a resource during my transition and found the Interview Insights to be incredibly helpful. Today, the Lifestyle and Career Development sections are my go-to. I’m living my best post-Army life, and I thank G.I. Jobs for the role it played in getting me here!"

Limit your distractions from outside sources. Try not to answer phone calls that aren't work related. Train your dog not to interrupt or don't allow him in the room during work hours. (This is especially important if you make and take business calls; a dog barking in the background is unprofessional and distracting.) Do not turn on the TV and don't surf the web unless that is part of your job description.
3. Birch Creek Communications – BCC periodically looks for people to do data entry; when they do, they’re looking for independent contractors just like everyone else. Pay is by the job and your performance, with their uppermost pay range going to those with consistent near-perfect accuracy. You can set whatever schedule you wish with them, but it looks like work is most widely available Monday through Friday on a corporate schedule.
Talk about easier said than done, but another danger in working from home is that it's so easy not to work. (Thankfully, they're no longer televising Olympic hockey games in the middle of the workday. I'll have to work something out for the World Cup.) One winning strategy is simply to accept that you'll never be 100 percent productive. That makes it easier to be in control of your "mind-wandering" time at work, and keep it under control.
I strongly want to work from home for the flexibility, my sanity, and my family. I can’t take working in a cubicle in an office environment anymore. I need and want something different and I need to act now. Thank you for giving me insight on the job market. I appreciate it and will definetely check these opportunities out and get a job asap. Thank you once again.

While this is not technically “at home,” you can still earn great money without ever getting on the phone using your personal car, bike, or scooter to deliver food, give people rides, and even picking up groceries. The great thing about these companies is that it's also very flexible work. No one is telling you when to start and stop. You just do as much work as you can, when you can.
Run virtual errands. If you have a computer with Internet connection and are good at searching the Web and communicating with others, you can become a virtual personal assistant with Fancy Hands. The service hires assistants, who set their own hours, to help its users tackle tasks such as making calls to service providers, scheduling appointments, and finding the best prices for services and products. You get paid per task, starting at between $3 and $7.
In addition to checking the websites previously mentioned, here are a few more sites that may help as you search for a work-at-home job: Indeed.com aggregates job listings from newspaper classifieds and other sources; craigslist.com features jobs posted directly by employers; MomCorps.com focuses on jobs that offer flexible working conditions; and TJobs.com lists telecommuting jobs (the site charges a one-time $15 to gain access to complete listings).
Limit your distractions from outside sources. Try not to answer phone calls that aren't work related. Train your dog not to interrupt or don't allow him in the room during work hours. (This is especially important if you make and take business calls; a dog barking in the background is unprofessional and distracting.) Do not turn on the TV and don't surf the web unless that is part of your job description.
Perhaps you’re raising kids and you’re committed to not using daycare. Maybe you’re a little older and can’t commit to a full-time job. Or you might be injured or disabled, making it difficult for you to leave your home each day. Whatever your reason is, if you’re stuck at home most of the day, you’ve probably thought about the income you could be making by taking a work-from-home job or running your own business.
We all know we should be investing money, but it isn’t always as easy as it sounds. This is especially the case for those with limited dispensable cash or inconsistent income. Acorns (get $5 to invest when you sign up through this link) is an app that will allow you to round up your everyday purchases and invest that spare change. While you may be unable to write a sizeable check for investing each month, you may not notice an extra $.25 tacked onto your morning Starbucks. Stockpile is another micro-investing platform I love. Get $5 to invest free when you sign up here.

What It Is: Students in countries including Japan, Korea, France and Germany are looking for English speakers to practice with. Sessions focus on things like making professional small talk or running a meeting (trainers are provided with specifics on how to teach each topic, and are also trained themselves for two days before starting the job). Lessons take place either over the phone or on a live Internet video service like Skype — sometimes at night, because you're working with students in different time zones. You need to commit to a minimum of 20 hours a week at consistent times, and can work as many as 35 hours.

For sure! I think that’s something Jeff and I have learned rather quickly is to definitely not put all your eggs in one basket. We had 1-2 affiliates that we promoted for the longest time that were by and large our main sources of income. We realized that if we lost even 1 of those affiliates we would be in for a huge world of hurt when it came to our monthly intake.
"If anyone else is going to be at home when you're working, they just have to be clear that when you're in your 'office' (in my case, my signal to the family is having headphones on), you're working -- even if it looks like and feels like you're hanging out at home. It's easy to get distracted by the many things that have to be done around the house during the day."
But getting a call-center job isn't easy. "[T]he number of job applicants for home-based positions far exceeds the number of jobs available," note authors Kate Lister and Tom Harnish in Undress for Success. LiveOps, for example, receives more than 150,000 job applications a year. From that number, only about 4,500 people are hired. To make the grade you must be computer savvy, demonstrate a professional-sounding telephone manner, and have a quiet workspace (no barking dogs or noisy children). And, of course, you need your own computer, a high-speed connection, and perhaps a dedicated phone line. (For call center job leads, check out RatRaceRebellion.com and AlpineAccess.com.)
Also, every contact is a useful, important touchpoint. We find that identifying personality types enables us to zero in with highly targetted personality-specific messages along the path to purchase. So that when the moment is right they “feel” right and choose to buy from our clients. People decide differently. Personbality marketing can guide their thinking.
Prospects willing to pay the $50 upfront free are then given a hard sell about how they can generate a $1,000 commission on each product sale, not only on sales made directly but also on sales made by each person in one's "downline." (In this case, the product being sold is a time-share-like resort-vacation package.) But, of course, you can't start earning those $1,000 commissions unless you sign up—which costs about $3,000.
Watch other people’s kids along with your own. There’s a good chance your friends who work outside of their homes would be thrilled to have an experienced parent watch their children while they are at the office. It can be manageable if your friend in need has only one or two kids. Plus, the new playmates will help keep your children occupied for a few hours. Pay varies widely based on where you live and the ages and number of kids you'll be watching, but babysitters and nannies typically can make up to $10 an hour in small cities and much more – even double that hourly rate – in larger cities.
Jobs that let you work from home, an arrangement known as telecommuting, are all the rage these days. According to a 2017 Gallup survey of more than 15,000 working adults, 43% of respondents said they spent at least some time in 2016 working remotely—four percentage points higher than in 2012. Not only are more people working from home, they’re also doing so more often: Of those surveyed, 31% worked from home four to five days per week, up from 24% in 2012.
Do you need to succeed at working from home because you own a home-based business or you work freelance? Congratulations! You are a maverick and believe so much in your product or services that you are willing to forgo the traditional work setting and that JOB. You have left the office or the factory and you are striking out on your own. It is beyond imperative that you succeed!
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