When I tell people I make money online they tend to assume that I'm running some sort of Ponzi scheme. But I've never been a good enough liar to pull that off, so instead I blog. While I make pocket change compared to the biggest names out there, there are plenty of other people who have completely replaced their full-time jobs in favor of making a living online (and we're talking six-figure revenues).  
Boy, do I love when people cut out the BS and tell it like it is. Thanks Jon! I went into blogging last summer fairly naively, thinking because I was tenacious, a great writer, and a professional marketer that I could run laps around everybody else. Well like most, I’ve been humbled, frustrated, confused, frustrated, perplexed. I’ve tore things apart and put them back together. I’ve cursed aWeber and used four-letter words about WP, not because they were doing anything wrong, but because I couldn’t figure out code and how to make things work as a one woman band. Oh the joys. I’m not giving up. I have my nose to the keyboard and will attend your webinar. Thanks for the frankness.
I really like point #1. So many people I talk to are excited about their idea because nobody is doing it or else they don’t want to do something because someone already is. I’m a believer that no competition is a worse sign than a lot of competition. If you were mining for gold back in the day, would you rather be near San Francisco where everyone was finding gold, or would you rather be in New Mexico with no competition (assuming nobody found gold in New Mexico)? The analogy is a little weak, but it gets the point across. Thanks for the great post, and keep up the legendary work.

Working from home can be tough, but anyone can be successful as long as they try and put in the work! I have seen people have crazy hardships come their way, yet they didn’t let that stop them! I have seen people withe very reason to quit, refuse to, and succeed instead! I myself struggle most days as I suffer from an autoimmune disease and am sick quite often….yet I let that drive me to succeed in order to show people, nothing can stop you if you are determined!
Connecting on social media is vital for a digital marketing position. Every Twitter and Facebook account has someone behind the wheel. When making the move from a cubicle to home, a social media or digital gig is often first posted on a company’s social media channels. Follow your faves, or perform searches with keywords like “remote” or “work from home”
But these are just a small fraction of the many real remote jobs out there. To learn how to find even more at-home employment positions check out my ebook The Ultimate Guide to Finding a Full-Time Remote Job With Benefits. This 74-page mega guide will give you the direction needed to finally kick your cubicle to the curb. The best part? You can pay what you want for it! So, go ahead and get your copy today.
Many people often dream of making a living right from the comfort of their own home. To many, it sounds too good to be true. With a bit of ingenuity combined with some discipline there are ways to earn a living from home using the skills and equipment you may already have on hand. The internet, for the most part, is responsible for creating the ever-increasing work from home, or telecommute, workforce. Here are nine jobs that let you work from home to help turn your dream into a reality, and often be your own boss as well!

Are You Financially Prepared for Self-Employment? If you're currently working outside the home, many experts recommend that you have a year's worth of living expenses squirreled away before starting a business. Of course, not every entrepreneur follows that advice, but most experts agree that at the very least, you need to plan for a few lean months if you're giving up a regular paycheck. "One of the biggest mistakes that people make is not having enough money to get them through the first years," says Beverley Williams, president of the American Association of Home-Based Businesses. "You have to look at your finances and spending habits and then ask how long you can go before you feel the pinch."


Make money by delivering food from restaurants to hungry customers. With Uber Eats, you apply to be a driver, and once accepted, you log into the app and start taking on assignments. You'll earn $2.60 to pick up the order, $1.15 per mile to the dropoff destination, and $1.00 for delivery. Payments can be made via direct deposit (takes one week) or you can get paid instantly with Instant Pay.
Often, if you find one of these "too good to be true" links that promise you a stay at home job, the ad will have a screaming headline such as "Area Mom Makes $3K a week From Home." Often, these links will take you to fake-looking news websites that use a news format to lend legitimacy to the extraordinary claims. After the article, you'll be offered a free CD-ROM trial. Perhaps the CD teaches you to make money with Google, or how you can start your own blogging business, or become a social media star. It sounds great right?
Thank you Carly! I read this post about a month ago and took to heart what you have said here. I’m an industrial engineer by profession for over 16 years. However, when I married and came to the US with my husband, I have been a homemaker. Now I love this and I don’t miss being an industrial engineer, but I wanted to do more. After reading your post I started my own blog/review site. Since I’m doing very in-depth honest reviews, it takes time but I am enjoying it very much. I appreciate your site and just wanted to finally take a moment to tell you.
A Google search on "make money from home" yields about 1.8 million results, some touting intriguing pitch lines such as "Earn $500-$1000 per day" and "Mom Makes $5K/Month at Home." Guess what? Most such ads are simply scams dressed up in work-at-home clothing. Christine Durst, cofounder of Staffcentrix, a virtual-careers training company, estimates that more than 98 percent of advertised work-at-home ideas are either "outright scams or downright suspicious." (Durst's company screens online job offers and rates them at RatRaceRebellion.com. Another site that investigates work-at-home ideas is IveTriedThat.com —their slogan: "We lose money so you don't have to.")
Skill. If you’re going to sew for other people, your skills need to be far above average. If you’re a beginner or an average seamstress, wait until you improve their skills before attempting to earn money in this type of business. If people are going to trust their wedding dresses or their favorite sports jacket to you, you must be able to handle them with care and the utmost skill.
You absolutely have to be available for questions at all times. The general rule of thumb is that you want to respond to questions within 1 hour. I know it seems harsh, but if you call a company, do you want them to call you back next week? Or do you want help now? Because I guarantee you, they'll just go somewhere else, buy from someone else, and you lost the sale. Likewise, always be professional and polite. There are times where you'll wanna slap someone.
Advertising. You’ll need to get the word out about your sewing business, and one of the best places to start is with your friends and neighbors. Make sure they are all aware of your services and are willing to pass around your business cards. In addition, you should put up fliers in local fabric stores and get to know the employees so that if someone asks, they’ll be able to refer you. Any business needs a website, and yours will be no exception; you can put up a simple one that outlines what you do, and tells the reader what kinds of prices to expect. Finally, by joining organizations like the American Sewing Guild, you’ll be able to stay in touch with others who are doing the same thing as you.
"When I'm powering through my inbox, I need some intense and catchy rap/R&B (like Nicki Minaj or Miley Cyrus) blasting through my headphones, but when I'm writing, Tom Petty is the trick. Finding what music motivates and focuses me for different tasks (and then sticking to those playlists for those tasks) has completely changed my WFH productivity."
This is pretty much the same position as an in-house recruiter - expect you get to work wherever you want. The other major difference is that you search the web to find the right employee for the right position. You’re also responsible for screening the applicant and being a part of the interviewing and negotiation process. There are even recruiters being paid upward of $125/hr for building resume templates.
At the peak of that role, I went to my manager and explained how much I enjoyed what I was doing, but that I needed something at that time that empowered me to find a better life-work integration. With support from my entire management team, I found another role within Capital One that stretched me in new ways while enabling me to be the best me—in life and at work. While it was a hard decision, I’m so glad I found the courage to ask for what I needed.

Separating your technology from the place where you come to recharge and disconnect at the end of the day is invaluable to the discipline needed for working remotely. Just as you should wake up in a room absent of technology, you should return to one once you’ve completed a day’s work. When you log off for the day, log off. Close your work chat programs and emails and consider yourself “out for the day,” and “home now.”
If you’re looking for inspiration, my friend Michelle Schroeder-Gardner of the website Making Sense of Sense has become the expert on all things affiliate marketing. Michelle earns more than $100,000 per month from her blog and the bulk of her income comes from affiliate sales. Michelle has had so much success with affiliate marketing that she even has her own course called Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.
One long final whistle means practice is over, so I need to wrap this up, stop for milk and get home to start the tacos. Right now, the workday is over—unless, of course, I pick it up later. It’s a scattered arrangement, but it’s working for me. Like Bloom says, you maintain your independence. You feel professional, and you stay connected. And sometimes, if you want, you get to wear pajamas.

When people think about working from home, many imagine sleeping in late, lounging around in their pajamas and long leisurely lunches. “But what people need to realize is that even though working from home offers a great amount of flexibility, it is still a professional job and it needs to be treated as such,” says Holly Reisem Hanna, the founder of The Work at Home Woman, an award-winning blog dedicated to helping women and moms fulfill their dreams of working from home or becoming self-employed.

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