In efforts to reduce costs, many companies across many industries hire employees and contractors to work from home. Between 2005 and 2012, the commonality of telecommuting increased dramatically. According to a publication by Global Workforce Analytics, for-profit companies saw an increase of over 70 percent, and not-for-profit saw an increase of over 87 percent in the incidence of telecommuting during that seven-year time frame. During the late 1990s and early 2000s, when people heard about telecommuting jobs, they would often associate them with either mail-stuffing jobs in which the pay was minuscule or in some cases, with scams.

Businesses are in need of someone to design their logo, website, or visual ads. If you have a degree or certification in this area, you can make a comfortable salary or $45,000 annually. This is starting, the better you get, the more clients will refer other clients over to you. Here is a killer guide I put together on how to build a website that should help you get started.
Many of my readers have started proofreading from their iPads, scanning legal documents for court reporters as a result of the Proofread Anywhere eCourse I recommend. You can read some of their testimonials in the comments on this post. They offer a 7-day intro course free so you can decide if that line of work is right for you before you pursue the training.
As usual, another good one from Copyblogger. I feel the most important is the Point 4. Unless people trust you, nothing will move. I have explained in detail the various means of building a community of trusted people for your business to flourish. My take on trust can be read at http://sidsavenue.blogspot.com/2012/03/are-you-aware-of-theory-of-traffic-and.ht ml
Cassidy Solis has served since September, 2012, as the Senior Advisor, Workplace Flexibility, for SHRM’s Effective and Flexible Workplace Initiative. She is responsible for growing When Work Works, a nationwide initiative that brings research on workplace effectiveness and flexibility into community and business practice, and for educating employers about effective and flexible workplace practices.
When I saw the title “5 Harsh Realities of Making a Living Online” in my Google Reader I was very happy. I agree with you, not enough people talk about the fact that it’s NOT EASY. It takes a tremendous amount of time, effort and energy – and even then you are not guaranteed the results you want. It’s basically just as risky and time consuming as building a business in the “Real” world (i.e. not online.) For some reason, people think that being “online” makes it easier – but it doesn’t.
What are your organization's best practices for helping working parents succeed at work? Tell the story, apply for the When Work Works Award! - The When Work Works Award is part of SHRM’s national initiative that helps employers become more successful by transforming the way they view and adopt effective and flexible workplaces. The award application window is open now – May 25, 2018. For more information and to apply click HERE.
This was weird. By and large, I don’t like people. You’ve been in offices. You’ve seen these people in offices: the guy who assumes you just asked about his fantasy football strategy and the woman who’s obviously stealing your chili from the breakroom fridge—which is totally messed up. (Seriously, we can smell the cayenne on your breath, Margaret.) Offices are sites of productivity, shared goals and socializing; they’re also fluorescent breeding grounds for dramas of the human condition… and for people with annoying ringtones.
“I think it depends almost entirely on the individual,” says Jenny Foss, a recruiter, career coach and founder of the career blog JobJenny.com. “As someone who made the transition–first to working part-time in an office and part-time at home, and then to being at home full time, and now, back to a split schedule–I understand first-hand that working from home is much different than an office environment. Those who are going adjust well to it, and be happy with working from home, will be those who are self-disciplined with their time, don’t rely on face-to-face banter with co-workers throughout the day, and those who are independent when it comes to administrative issues that will invariably crop up throughout any given week.”
If you want to learn how to day trade working from home so you can simply make an extra $200-300 a day, that’s great!  If you start day trading and get hooked like me, that’s even better.  I have students who have fallen into both categories, but most students who begin to hit the $200-300 a day goals take that success to the next level and are making $500-1000/day.  If you are ready to get started please feel free to email me [email protected].  I’m always here to answer your questions!
The bottom line: Remote work is not an excuse to get up late, work in your pajamas and enjoy freedom from responsibility. It is, however, a viable career option that permits you to avoid cubicle life and long commutes, options when arranging your work schedule, and the comforts of your own home/office/favorite cafe. As long as the pay is enough for your needs, remote work can be a pleasant, productive and rewarding career.
Kanarek says if you’re not taken seriously, it's important to let friends and family know that although you're working from home, you're still working. And if you’re feeling lonely or unmotivated, work from a coffee shop or a restaurant a few hours a week. “While you may not interact with anyone, being around others can motivate you to work,” Kanarek says.
×