Working mothers bring a diverse and powerful set of experiences that can contribute to a successful team in the workplace. Research shows that a team of people with different backgrounds and perspectives leads to lower costs, higher revenues and increased profits—which translates to delivering for our customers in a better way. One of the greatest joys of my career has been my experience working in so many parts of the business, from front-line customer support to process management and even branding. In moving across functions, I’ve been able to learn from colleagues who approach challenges, manage teams and create solutions in unique ways, giving me an ever-increasing appreciation of diverse perspectives.

9. Amazon mTurk – Amazon Mechanical Turk is the lion of microtask sites and you can find data entry work among their thousands of available tasks. Once you register with their site, you can select HITs (Human Intelligence Tasks) that sound interesting to you; sometimes, you must complete a qualifier to land the task. You’re only paid if your work is accepted. There can be some shady tasks listed on mTurk, so be careful and don’t pick up any HITs that feel wrong. Payment is made via Amazon gift cards or through bank deposit.
If talking on the phone is not practical for you, you can still work a customer service job from home. Many of the same companies that hire call center agents, also hire chat agents. And in addition to these customer service chat jobs, there are other online chat jobs from home. These include answering questions, doing internet research, moderating in social media and more. 
Alice’s Table empowers women to start their own flower arranging events businesses in their communities. Alice’s Table provides the ongoing training, and support women need to launch their businesses, and connects them to a community of hosts across the country. The Alice’s Table host program prioritizes living well and working hard — giving women the opportunity to create a career for themselves that is flexible and creative, while also challenging, sustainable and inspiring. With Alice’s Table, you take home up to 70% of ticket sales (before the cost of flowers) and can earn up to $600 per two-hour event (depending on the size of the event). You also have the opportunity to earn mentoring bonuses. Click here to apply and mention you saw us on The Work at Home Woman.
If carving out time to work is difficult, then knowing when to stop can be harder still. If you find yourself working on weekends, checking e-mail in the wee hours, and hauling your laptop to soccer games, force yourself to stop: You're on the path to burnout. You'll also lose credibility with your family. Who, after all, will believe that your home-business plan was conceived with your family in mind if you spend all of your time working? Remember to keep the focus on your ultimate goals: You want a business of your own, but you also want a family life.
The hardest part is the focus. Much has been written about the smudging of the line between work and home, how our phones have left us perennially plugged-in, how off is on and time clocks are never really punched. But working from home takes whatever tenuous delineation is left and obliterates it; at the very least, at an office, you have to physically transport your anxiety to another location. I don’t have a home office; my workspace is basically the kitchen table—once I’ve fed two kids breakfast, put one on the 7:04 a.m. bus, take the other to daycare and return home to clear my “workspace” of Lucky Charms and syrup.
Of course, many people who enter direct-sales businesses aren't really looking to earn a full-time living. They simply want to generate a certain level of supplemental income. If that's your goal, and you're able to build up a small but loyal clientele, a direct-sales business could be just the thing to add several hundred dollars to your income every year (and allow you to get personal discounts on products to boot).
Hanna believes some of the biggest challenges that home-based workers face are learning how to avoid distractions, dealing with social isolation, and others not taking your work at home status seriously. “Luckily, with a few minor adjustments to your mindset and some honest communication with those around you, these can easily be solved,” she says.
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